Love Louisville

Exploring Louisville Neighborhoods: St. Matthews

Let’s explore one of the most popular cities within a city, St. Matthews and discover what it has to offer people searching the listings of homes for sale in St. Matthews or those thinking about relocating to the Louisville area. Since Jefferson County KY has merged with the city of Louisville, Louisville Metro is in the top 18 largest metropolitan areas of the United States. This sprawling city is truly a melting pot of cultures located on the Ohio River and the residents of St. Matthews enjoy the best of a small city and a large metro city simultaneously.

History

The city of St. Matthews grew up around the intersecting points of Breckinridge Lane, Westport Road, and Shelbyville Road directly along the railroad. The area was originally Tree Lined St Matthews Streetfarmland owned by farmers Monohan, Brown, Nanz, Rudy, and Oeschner. These are the same names you will find on streets, parks, and monuments throughout the city of Louisville. In the early 20th century, St. Matthews saw residential growth from the use of the automobile and transit traffic. In 1937, the Ohio River rose to dangerous levels, flooding much of the city. Many residents fled the flood plain in search of a drier area to raise their families. Many of these fled southeast from the downtown area into the area that is present day St. Matthews.

Today

In the new millennium, St. Matthews is a bustling mini-city that only continues to develop. The railroad still goes through the neighborhood, and it is still used for cargo transit today. St. Matthews is both residential and commercial;...

St. James Art Fair

The first full weekend in October each year means more to Louisville home owners than just beautiful fall weather and amazing color in the turning leaves. Derby City becomes an artistic Mecca annually this time of year when thousands flock to the St. James Art Fair to experience the vitality of today’s art against the backdrop of Old Louisville’s beauty and charm. What began as a small street fair is now an event that has put Louisville on the map with first-class artists and craftspeople across the nation. A look at the how this juried event has developed over the years provides a glimpse into Louisville’s love of the arts, capacity for growth and spirit of innovation.

Now that it’s in its 56th year and has become one of the most highly anticipated art fairs anywhere around, it can be hard to believe its humble beginnings. Known today as one of the premiere addresses in Louisville for its history and stately Victorian homes, St. James Court struggled financially back in 1957. With no money in the bank and heaping debt due to costly repairs to the St. James Fountain, the St. James Court Association had to come up with some way to pay the bills. The association president at that time, Malcolm Bird, thought an art fair might be just the remedy and could be a fun way to bring area residents together as well. So on Oct. 12, 1957, the St. James Court Art Fair was born.

In its first year, the focus was on art alone, and works were actually hung on clotheslines between trees as part of the exhibit. In the early years, music was also added, and the annual art fair became a time to honor notable homes and residents as well. By 1967, Mr. Bird’s last year as the chairman of the event, attendance reached 40,000. For the next 25 years, under the leadership of Ann Higbie and Oscar Stremmel, the annual event grew from 200 to roughly 600 exhibitors and included Belgravia Court as well as St. James. Over the next decade, new portions...

Homearama 2012 for the latest in Louisville Real Estate

If you are looking to buy a home in Louisville, get some ideas to fix up your current house or if you just like to look at other people’s homes - hope, inspiration, or interest is just around the corner. The Home Builders Association of Louisville’s annual Homearama begins July 14th and runs through the 29th.  Homearama began in 1968, and is a tour of new homes, showcasing home builders, interior designers, landscape architects, and craftspeople. This year’s Homearama is unique in that it is taking place at two separate locations; the Rock Springs neighborhood and the Shakes Run neighborhood.

Rock Springs is located on Highway 22, a mile past the Summit. With a convenient location, and many amenities, the Rock Springs Community is a great neighborhood to be a part of. Rock Springs offers its residents a playground, nature trail, and is close to Springhurst and I-71. Rock Springs is marked by its impressive entry feature, a striking rock fountain. 

Shakes Run is located off of Shelbyville Road on Fisherville Road. Shakes Run is a beautiful community, with 70 acres of green space including creeks, a fishing pond, and walking trails. There is a clubhouse with a junior Olympic sized pool, and wooded lots available. 

For Homearama, Rock Springs will have ten new homes to tour, and Shakes Run will have seven. Many of the homes will be featuring energy efficient products, outdoor living spaces, and finished basements. Each house in Homearama will be given an energy efficiency index rating, so you can compare each home like you would compare two cars with gas mileage.

At Homearama, available homes are for sale, as well as artwork and furniture. If you find a home you like, you better hurry, of the ten new homes in Rock Springs, eight have already been sold.  

Bob Thieneman, the Rock Springs neighborhood developer, is expecting 30,000 to 40,000 people to show up to the event this year. Homearama...

Louisville's Forecastle Then and Now

Music lovers are anxiously counting down the days until next weekend’s highly anticipated Forecastle Festival. Forecastle will be celebrating their 10th anniversary July 13-15 with the most impressive line up of bands yet. Headliners include Girl Talk, Wilco, Bassnectar, and Louisville’s own My Morning Jacket.

The Forecastle Festival began in 2002 as a free Summer festival in Tyler Park with the purpose of bringing the like-minded music community together.  A grass roots venture, talent played for free, infrastructure cost nothing, and the event only cost five-hundred dollars to produce.   JK McKnight, the brains behind the operation, decided the following year to add something special to the festival.  McKnight invited sculpture Mike Ratterman to head up the effort in bringing in the local art community.  The 2003 Forecastle Festival included over thirty local artists exhibiting their work under the Tyler Park limestone bridge. In addition to the artists, environmental and socially-conscience activists educated audience members.  This was the birth of the Forecastle trademark slogan Music.Art.Activism. Creating a unique experience where music, art, and activism went hand in hand was brilliant, and is working for the Festival to this day.  Over the next few years, Forecastle continued to grow in size and popularity. It quickly outgrew it’s Tyler Park home and needed to find a new one. The Festival moved to Cherokee Park, the Mellwood Arts Center and then finally found it’s current home at the Waterfront.  

The Forecastle Festival has been nationally recognized in many well-respected publications and media sources.  After a noteworthy performance by the all-female rock trio “Sleater Kinnley,” the Festival was shoved into the National spotlight.  The band announced that they would dismember shortly after their Festival performance,  so everyone, including MTV, CNN, Billboard,...

Hiking in and around Louisville, KY

Fall is for Hiking in and around Louisville, KY!

It’s fall, my favorite season!  That means it’s time to get out your jackets, turn your clocks back, grab a cup of pumpkin spice coffee,  get out and enjoy the beauty that is nature. Fall is a great time to be outside, the temperatures are perfect-“hoodie weather”, you don’t need to carry your bug spray, and you can roll your windows down in your car and enjoy.  

If you live in Louisville Kentucky, the leaves in the fall are no doubt one of the most beautiful visions one can see.  The colors are so infinite, vibrant and mesmerizing, there is nothing quite like it.  Going for a hike is the best way to fully experience fall, and Louisville, KY has some great local hiking trails.  There are trails for everyone, whether you want to go a few miles down the road to Cherokee Park, or across town to the nation’s largest urban forest, Jefferson Memorial located close to South Louisville Homes and there are trails here for everyone.


Below is a list of trails around metro Louisville.  If you are looking for something close to home, hilly, paved, wooded, flat, close to lakes, creeks or waterfalls, there is something here for you.  All the trails do have one thing in common; they will leave you feeling relaxed, serene, peaceful, and connected to nature. It’s a great time to get out of  your Louisville Homes and experience some of the great aspects of living in Louisville.

Goose Creek Nature Trail in EP Tom Sawyer State Park This trail is great for a quick nature fix if you are running low on time.  Located in eastern Jefferson County, this hike is a 1.5 mile loop, is mostly flat, tree lined, and passes along Goose Creek.

Cull Hollow Trail...

Halloween Events in Louisville, KY

What is going on in Louisville this Halloween?

So you spent the last 6 months finding all the trinkets and finishing touches to get your costume perfect for Halloween, but now you have nowhere to go.  No fear.  Check out some of the chilling events going on in Louisville this Halloween.

What:  Bardstown Bound Boofest.  Celebrate Halloween Highland style with Trolley Rides, Trick or Treating and special Halloween themed indulgences offered at participating businesses along the way as well as scary special offers.
Where:  Highlands-Douglas Loop to Lexington Rd.
When:  Saturday October 29th 12:00pm-?
*Proceeds benefit Gilda’s Club.

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